Balancing Act: Job burnout? How to recognize it, how to cure it and how to avoid it

By Cindy Krischer Goodman
Miami Herald

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) 95 percent of human resource leaders say burnout is the No. 1 culprit of turnover. Although burnout is a problem at companies of all sizes, larger organizations reported more of problem, particularly those companies with more than 2,500 employees.

Miami Herald

If you woke up this morning feeling exhausted, stressed and wondering how you can possibly make it through a long day at work, you’re not alone.

An increasing number of employees feel that way and don’t know what to do about it. Burnout, that troubled feeling of physical or mental collapse from overwork or stress, is going to be a huge problem for companies and their workers in 2017.

Already, 95 percent of human resource leaders say burnout is the No. 1 culprit of turnover, according to a new study of 614 HR officials conducted by Kronos Incorporated, a Massachusetts-based workforce management solutions firm, and Future Workplace, a New York talent management firm. Although burnout is a problem at companies of all sizes, larger organizations reported more of problem, particularly those companies with more than 2,500 employees.

For some employees, burnout stems from a perception of unfair pay, unreasonable workload or working too many hours. For others, it is the result of poor management, a negative workplace culture or insufficient technology to do their jobs, the survey shows.

Many companies are well aware that a high percentage of their employees are burnt out and ready to bolt. However, organizations reported in the survey that they have too many competing priorities to focus on fixing the issue in 2017 and lack executive support for improvements.

But there is a way out.

Overcoming burnout, and the fatigue, irritability and exhaustion that are symptoms of it, starts with breaking the cycle of destructive behavior. Stop and think how you got to your current state of burnout. Have you mismanaged your time, failed to delegate, or allowed your work to take an emotional toll? Is your burnout the fault of your employer’s unfair expectations, lack of guidance and scant praise or appreciation? Is your profession one with high stakes and you’re failing to take the necessary breaks?

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