Do You Have What It Takes To Remain ‘Relevant’?

By Cindy Krischer Goodman
Miami Herald

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Staying relevant involves more than just keeping abreast of current events or being aware of the changes around you. According to California-based management consultant Ross Shafer “Relevance is taking action to make sure you matter to your organization, your customers, your clients and your teams.”

Miami Herald

When she first tried Twitter, Cher said, she felt old and stupid: She was slow and clumsy with the social media channel; many of its other users were born well after her first hit song. But she persisted, she told a TV interviewer, because she wanted a real-time forum in which to express her views.

Now, 3.5 million fans follow the 70-year-old singer’s emoji-laced, widely shared tweets. By choosing to master Twitter, she has burnished her star power, boosted her brand and touched lives. In short, she stayed relevant.

In an era of disruption, technological advances, new workplace trends and constantly emerging communication styles, everyone needs to follow Cher’s example: Embrace change to stay relevant and effective.

Today, “relevant” means current and connected with what’s happening in your industry and the world. Doing so helps workers remain employable, relate to younger customers, influence the next generation and protect their careers. And it helps business leaders make better decisions.

Fail to stay relevant, and you become stale, as a person, leader, employee or organization.

Staying relevant involves more than just keeping abreast of current events or being aware of the changes around you.

“Relevance is taking action to make sure you matter to your organization, your customers, your clients and your teams,” according to California-based management consultant Ross Shafer.

In fact, most workers are probably aware they need to evolve. In an online survey of 1,600 adults released in October, Illinois-based Pearson Embanet, a global learning company, found 72 percent of respondents said more education was needed to keep up with advances in their field and 69 percent of respondents said technology would significantly transform their job within the next five years.

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