‘A Day Without A Woman’ Draws Thousands To Bay Area Rallies While Others Skip Work In Solidarity

By Patrick May and Martha Ross
Mercury News

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Coinciding with International Women’s Day and organized by the same people behind the earlier demonstrations, the “A Day Without A Woman” strike called for equal pay, reproductive freedom, immigrant rights and an end to sexual harassment and gender discrimination.

Mercury News

Across the Bay Area Wednesday, women joined a national movement aimed to highlight the magnitude of women’s contributions by marching, rallying, wearing red and even staying home from work to show their solidarity with a “Day Without a Woman” strike.

At Palo Alto High School, 45 staff members and 31 teachers were out — a normal day would have seen 10 or so — while shops like Donut Savant in Oakland closed their doors for the day, citing the national strike.

Silicon Valley tech companies voiced their support for the strike in various ways. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey changed his profile picture to red and the company showcased some of the women engineers in a video, while Facebook was encouraging women to share live videos of their stories, interview a female entrepreneur, or tell their friends about a women-owned business.

The one-day strike builds on the momentum from the women’s marches in Washington, D.C., and cities across the globe, which drew more than five million people, as well as the recent Day Without Immigrants, which saw several local businesses shut their doors in solidarity.

Coinciding with International Women’s Day and organized by the same people behind the earlier demonstrations, the “A Day Without A Woman” strike is calling for equal pay, reproductive freedom, immigrant rights and an end to sexual harassment and gender discrimination.

It’s impact reverberated in businesses throughout the Bay Area.

Uber and Lyft told employees that they were welcome to take the day off to participate, and many in the companies’ San Francisco offices took their employers up on the offer. “It is quiet here today,” Adrian Durbin, Lyft’s director of corporate and policy communications, wrote in an email.

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