Facebook Courts YouTubers, Viners And Other Content Creators

By David Pierson
Los Angeles Times

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) In the last year, Facebook has doubled its daily video views to 8 billion and rolled out Facebook Live, a live-streaming service that’s quickly building momentum, having already attracted celebrities and big-name publishers.

Los Angeles Times

Skyy John owes much of his early Internet fame to YouTube, where he’s amassed nearly 3 million subscribers to his cocktail tutorial channel, Tipsy Bartender.

But more recently, John has switched up the recipe, posting clips for his strawberry margarita Jello shots or his mini vodka watermelon bowl on Facebook. The result? Millions more views and more people stopping him in public.

“That’s what turned me on to Facebook, when people would recognize me at the supermarket,” the 36-year-old former Barney’s Beanery bartender said.

John credits the change to the ease with which users can share his videos on Facebook, increasing the chances his outlandish drinks go viral.

He’s the type of closely followed video creator Facebook is now trying to appeal to at this year’s conference of digital stars, fans and advertisers known as VidCon.

In the last year, the Menlo Park, Calif., company has doubled its daily video views to 8 billion and rolled out Facebook Live, a live-streaming service that’s quickly building momentum, having already attracted celebrities and big-name publishers.

At VidCon, a three-day event in Anaheim that starts June 23, Facebook will get to hear firsthand from the top YouTubers, Viners and Snapchatters, among others, about what they want from a video platform.

“The goal and plan is to spend time there listening and talking with creators and the creative community, who are there in massive numbers,” said Sibyl Goldman, Facebook’s head of entertainment partnerships. “We want to get as much feedback as we can to inform what we do.”

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