Business Team

Forced To Pivot, Job-Matching Entrepreneur Now Has A Winning Strategy

By David Nicklaus
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) “The Whether”, is a new social-media-like recruiting platform that allows students, for free, to create a profile, complete a personality assessment and see which companies might be a good fit. They can also “favorite” employers to learn more about them.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Chris Motley thought he had a great product and a solid strategy. Then his target market blew up.

Motley, founder of job-matching startup Better Weekdays, planned to market his software to for-profit colleges. Because of their dismal job-placement records, many were in danger of losing access to federal student loans. If Better Weekdays could help more graduates find jobs, it could solve the colleges’ regulatory headache.

Then regulators turned up the heat. Some big for-profit operators, including Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institute, were forced to close their doors, leaving Motley’s business plan in tatters.

Better Weekdays had to pivot, but in which direction? Budgets were tight at traditional universities, so they weren’t likely to spend money on software to help their graduates. The job seekers themselves were unlikely to pay.

That left employers. As he researched the job market for new graduates, Motley learned two things: Companies spend heavily on campus recruiting, and they aren’t happy with the results.

“They spend $8 billion a year, and there’s no obvious solution that’s working for them,” he said.

Motley thinks he has that solution in The Whether, the social-media-like recruiting platform that Better Weekdays launched last week. It allows students, for free, to create a profile, complete a personality assessment and see which companies might be a good fit. They can “favorite” employers to learn more about them.

Employers pay $499 a month to post content and obtain data to help target their recruiting efforts. If a company gets a lot of favorites from a particular campus, it might send a recruiter there. If an engineering firm isn’t reaching students from a nearby engineering school, it may need to rethink its message.

Related News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *