Jessica Christianson uses a telemedicine kiosk at the Palm Beach County School District's administrative building in West Palm Beach, Fla. A medical device called an otoscope connected to the kiosk lets nurse practitioner Stella Leviyeva in Miami examine the inside of Christianson's ear. (Phil Galewitz/KHN/TNS)

Healthcare Meets Big Data

By Gali Weinreb
Globes, Tel Aviv, Israel

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) How to use big data to improve patient care? That is just one of several issues tackled at this years “Reboot Forum 2017.” Below is a list of some of the promising medical startups.

Globes, Tel Aviv, Israel

How can the healthcare system be rebooted?

Last month, ten projects — commercial startups, initiatives from within the healthcare system, and emerging ideas of private individuals, participated in the Leading Healthcare Initiative of Reboot Forum 2017, a multidisciplinary forum comprising diverse representatives from the healthcare system, who teamed up to brainstorm on ways to improve the system and ensure that it will continue to be economically sustainable.

It was clear from the finalists that data is the sought-after good in the healthcare system. Half of the ventures making presentations were commercial ventures that use big data analytics capabilities to improve patient care. Two other ventures are also engaged in data, but not with big data algorithms; and three ventures were classic medical device companies.

The judges’ discussion was lively; less because of disagreement over the quality of the ventures, and more because of the dilemma over what is the best way to kick-start change in the system — whether by supporting new ventures for which every shekel is important, or by supporting more mature ventures which have a lesser need of cash but set a standard of how the different parties want to see the healthcare system function in the future. The three winners will be announced at the joint Reboot Forum and “Globes” 2017 Sustainable Healthcare Conference on 13 June.

MedAware Ltd. — preventing prescription errors
MedAware uses the capabilities of learning systems to prevent prescription errors. In the presentation to the judges, Dr. Gidi Stein explained that the technology was developed after he learned of the case of a 9-year old boy who died after the doctor prescribed, instead of the routine drug that the child should have received, the next drug in the list of the HMO computer — a powerful blood thinner for adults. The boy fell off his bicycle and died of a brain hemorrhage, “A child was killed because of a typo,” says Stein.

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