The Looming Specter Of #MeToo Stories Turned Into Fodder For TV And Film

By Nina Metz
Chicago Tribune

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Melissa Silverstein, founder and publisher of the news site Women and Hollywood says, “I think we need to be really careful in how we handle these stories.”

Chicago Tribune

It is inevitable that the #MeToo movement will be turned into TV and film. But whose stories are being told? And who gets to tell them?

The answers feel, well, actually kind of predictable for Hollywood.

Last week, the New Yorker published a long and fascinating profile of TV producer Ryan Murphy and in it, he mentioned an idea for an anthology series called “Consent.”

Each episode would tackle a different storyline, “starting with an insider-y account of the Weinstein Company.

There would be an episode about Kevin Spacey, one about an ambiguous he-said-she-said encounter.”

Murphy’s shows, from “Glee” to “American Horror Story”, are tonally varied, but share what he describes as a “maximalist” approach to storytelling.

There is a grandness and an over-the-topness to his style and I’m not sure that aesthetic is suited to the (still) highly contentious topic of sexual violence and workplace harassment. Especially when he-said/she-said is such a common defense tactic used by harassers themselves; why in the world would Murphy consider lumping that in with anything exploring #MeToo?

Another high-profile project is Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” described as a collage of stories about a group of people looking to make it in Hollywood during the summer of 1969, set against the backdrop of the real-life murders of Sharon Tate and friends, which were set in motion by Charles Manson.

“I think we need to be really careful in how we handle these stories,” says Melissa Silverstein, founder and publisher of the news site Women and Hollywood. “One of the great conversations we have been having is: Who are the storytellers? And whose stories are centered in our culture? … We must ask these hard questions. Why are these projects being made? Why are they being funded? Why are these stories more valid than others?”

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