Experts say spending time in the neutral zone after a setback can offer insight on the past and perspective on the future, provided you do some soul-searching.  (Logan Bannatyne/LoLoStock/Fotolia)

Mental Health Therapists See Uptick In Patients Struggling With Postelection Anxiety

By Christine Clarridge
The Seattle Times

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) As news from the President Donald Trump’s administration saturates TV and newspapers, Some Seattle mental-health experts say a healthy number of their existing clients, and as many as 80 percent of potential new clients, according to one clinician, are seeking help for postelection distress.

SEATTLE

Puget Sound resident Marcus Searles considers himself an enthusiastic consumer of knowledge and information, but over the past couple of months, he’s had to turn off the news.

“It was everywhere, and it got to be too much,” said the 42-year-old.

Searles, who works as a title examiner for a Seattle escrow company, said the constant stream of political information was seeping into every part of his life.

He worried about his mother because she is an immigrant from Barbados; he worried about his young children who expressed fears of the new president, a worry that he said robs them of their childhood. He couldn’t focus at work and slumber eluded him.
For the first time in his life, he found himself seeking relief from sleeping pills.

“It was affecting me as a person,” he said.

Searles’ story is not uncommon. As news from the President Donald Trump’s administration saturates TV and newspapers, local mental-health experts say a healthy number of their existing clients, and as many as 80 percent of potential new clients, according to one clinician, are seeking help for postelection distress.

“I’ve had people come back to therapy because of this election,” said clinical psychologist Marta Miranda, who specializes in working with members of marginalized and oppressed communities.

“They feel that they are being targeted as members of a minority group, and they’re afraid,” she said.

At Sound Mental Health, spokesman Steve McLean said one clinician estimated that at least 80 percent of his new patients have reported election-related stress, anxiety and fear.

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