A Midlife Crisis Doesn’t Have To Be A Crisis At All

By Danielle Braff
Chicago Tribune

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Janice Morris, an Austin,Texas-based psychologist says a midlife crisis, as popularly understood, refers to an emotional reaction to the realization that your life has time limits. If done with thought and care, the midlife crisis doesn’t have to be a crisis at all.

CHICAGO

Leigh Wilson has been working in the same cubicle in the same office for the past 12 years after spending 20 years climbing the corporate ladder.

The 41-year-old Chicago marketing manager, who is single and has no commitments, finally decided that she’d had enough of her mundane life.

“I wanted to do more,” Wilson said. “I have a nice little nest egg, and I reached a point in my life where I just don’t know what to do.”

Last month, she left her comfortable job with a steady salary to embark on a six-month, 10,000-mile solo trip, first hiking through Switzerland, followed by a road trip through the western United States with her dog to figure out where she wants to live next.

Wilson, who described her current life stage as a midlife crisis, said that many of her friends are going through similar phases.

“We’re all feeling, ‘Oh my gosh, I’m halfway to 80. Is this what I really want from my life?'”

A midlife crisis, as popularly understood, refers to an emotional reaction to the realization that your life has time limits, said Janice Morris, an Austin, Texas-based psychologist.

“The reaction typically involves anxiety or fear that the ways we have spent our time, along with the choices we have made, are not important enough, enjoyable enough or consistent with some ideal sense of self,” Morris said.
But these desires to live the life you truly want to live don’t simply occur at midlife.

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