In Racial Conflicts, Video Becomes A Megaphone

By Wendy Lee
San Francisco Chronicle

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) As columnist Wendy Lee reports, “The flow of video online is staggering. YouTube says more than 400 hours of video are posted every minute. And when conflicts are captured — racial and otherwise — the scenes are splashed on screens large and small around the world. But some wonder whether the internet-powered naming and shaming has gone overboard.”

San Francisco Chronicle

After Paula Nuguid was called a racial slur during a heated exchange, she sought social justice on the internet.

Nuguid was bicycling in Sunnyvale in June with her 9-year-old daughter when a man in a car behind her honked and yelled at her, so she whipped out her iPhone and started recording.

She said he called her a “bitch” and accused her of trying to make an illegal right turn, which she denies.

She called him an “entitled white prick” and suggested he leave the state. He replied, “Cambodian n–, get outta here.”

She shared the video in a private Facebook group, and soon it went viral. Strangers online quickly identified the man and his employer — Apple — and called for his resignation. A hashtag of his name appeared on social media, and a website posted updates for weeks afterward.

“Growing up as an immigrant, you are used to being ignored and your problems being ignored,” said Nuguid, who is Filipina American. “It made me feel like I finally mattered and I was visible.”

The flow of video online is staggering. YouTube says more than 400 hours of video are posted every minute. And when conflicts are captured — racial and otherwise — the scenes are splashed on screens large and small around the world. But some wonder whether the internet-powered naming and shaming has gone overboard.

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