Train Meditation And No Coffee? Pro Tips For A Healthier Morning Commute

By Morgan Smith
Chicago Tribune

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Wellness experts say diet isn’t the only trick to incorporating wellness into your morning commute. Paying attention to posture and movement can also help.

Chicago Tribune

As August arrives, the summer commute into work becomes a sweaty endeavor marked by crowded bodies, the stench of city garbage and exacerbated FOMO (“fear of missing out”) from missing another perfect beach day.

But imagine a weekday morning when, instead of rushing into the office with a sweating iced coffee and pit stains to match, you were calm. Confident. Even looking forward to your workday.

Wellness experts think such a thing is possible, part of a movement that prizes self-awareness and making small, conscious steps toward a healthier, fulfilling life, like adjusting your morning commute routine.

Judy Manisco, a registered nutritionist and dietitian in Chicago, believes that slight meal adjustments could drastically improve commuters’ well-being before work. “The key is to wake up early enough where you’re not running around, stressed about getting to work on time, but pacing yourself and eating a healthy breakfast before work,” she says.

Manisco suggests a balance of protein and carbohydrates to keep you full and energized until lunch. Her favorite breakfast? “A protein shake made from organic soy milk, raw, unsalted walnuts (they’re high in nutrient-dense omega-3 fatty acids), a variety of seeds, oat bran and either a stalk of celery or a handful of spinach,” Manisco says. For sweetness, she recommends adding natural cocoa or a date.

If you skip the protein shake, Manisco recommends whole-grain toast, a handful of nuts or seeds, and a cup of fruit. She warns against coffee. “Caffeine will get your heart and adrenals pumping artificially, and thus could have you feeling unnecessarily anxious or depressed,” Manisco says.

Diet isn’t the only trick to incorporating wellness into your morning commute. Paying attention to posture and movement can also help.

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