Women’s Wellness: Pregnant Later In Life

From Mayo Clinic News Network
Mayo Clinic News Network

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) The biological clock is a fact of life, but there’s nothing magical about age 35. It’s simply an age at which various risks become more discussion-worthy. This article takes a look at some of those risks.

Mayo Clinic News Network

Are you considering pregnancy after 35? Understand the issues for older mothers, and know what it takes to have a healthy pregnancy.

If you’re older than 35 and hoping to get pregnant, you’re in good company. Many women are delaying pregnancy well into their 30s and beyond, and delivering healthy babies. Taking special care can help give your baby the best start.

UNDERSTAND THE RISKS
The biological clock is a fact of life, but there’s nothing magical about age 35. It’s simply an age at which various risks become more discussion-worthy. For example:

-It might take longer to get pregnant. You’re born with a limited number of eggs. As you reach your mid- to late 30s, your eggs decrease in quantity and quality. An older woman’s eggs also aren’t fertilized as easily as a younger woman’s eggs. If you’re older than 35 and haven’t been able to conceive for six months, consider asking your health care provider for advice.

-You’re more likely to have a multiple pregnancy. The chance of having twins increases with age. The use of assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization, also can play a role.

-You’re more likely to develop gestational diabetes. This type of diabetes, which occurs only during pregnancy, is more common as women get older. Tight control of blood sugar through diet and physical activity is essential. Sometimes medication is needed, too. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause a baby to grow significantly larger than average _ which increases the risk of injuries during delivery.

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