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Nearly Half Of Economists Say US Economy Still Faces Considerable Downside Risks Over Next Year

Sarah Foster Bankrate.com

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr)Many of the experts express concern about the potential for negative developments, including those which would be essentially ‘manmade,’ either in the sense of an ineffective response to the still-present COVID-19 pandemic or a policy mistake among elected officials in Washington.

Bankrate

Times aren’t as tough as they were one year ago during the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, but economists still have a list of worries on their mind — from political division and a growth slowdown to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Over the next 12 to 18 months, risks facing the U.S. economy are tilted toward the downside, according to nearly half (or 47 percent) of economists polled for Bankrate’s Third-Quarter Economic Indicator survey. That was the largest cluster of respondents, with 26 percent seeing risks as tilted toward the upside and another 26 percent judging that risks were evenly balanced.

“It is interesting that many of the experts express concern about the potential for negative developments, including those which would be essentially ‘manmade,’ either in the sense of an ineffective response to the still-present COVID-19 pandemic or a policy mistake among elected officials in Washington,” says Mark Hamrick, Bankrate senior economic analyst and Washington bureau chief. “The so-called conventional wisdom held in some camps is that the government should stay out of the way. But many of the economists are concerned that our polarized politics have created risks that should be of concern for all Americans.”

This article is the fourth in a four-part series analyzing findings from Bankrate’s Third-Quarter Economic Indicator poll. We asked experts where they see the job market, unemployment, the Federal Reserve, the 10-year Treasury yield and inflation heading over the next 12 months. We also polled experts on the balance of risks facing the U.S. economy and what’s currently keeping them up at night.

The balance of risks facing the U.S. economy It’s not as if the best times are already behind the U.S. economy in its rebound from the pandemic. Driven by the economy’s reopening and elevated savings rates thanks to stimulus checks and unemployment benefits, experts predict that the financial system in 2021 will grow at its fastest rate in nearly four decades.

“The $1.5 trillion in excess savings from stimulus and personal savings will keep consumer spending strong, which is 70 percent of the economy,” says Robert Frick, corporate economist at Navy Federal Credit Union. “And while the employment situation may not improve as strongly as forecasted, wages and salaries overall will keep increasing, adding more to consumer spending power.”

The ultimate question, however, is how much that pace can be sustained. This year’s big boom was mostly related to massive fiscal stimulus meant to help hard-hit businesses and Americans make it through the crisis. But as that aid wears off and the economy comes down from its sugar-high, the financial system is bound to return to more normal levels of growth.

Officials at the Federal Reserve see the economy growing at a robust 5.9 percent in 2021 (though they downgraded that forecast from 7 percent in June), then slowing to a more modest pace of 3.8 percent in 2022 and 2.5 percent in 2023.

Economists in Bankrate’s poll cited soaring inflation, lagging labor force participation rates, political tension, supply chain issues and vaccine-resistant virus variants as the most prominent causes for concern over the next year and a half. Adding to the reasons to be positive about the outlook were ongoing vaccinations against the coronavirus and a recovering global economy.

“The economy will remain in recovery mode,” says Bernard Markstein, president and chief economist at Markstein Advisors. “The main question is how fast that will occur and how long it will take for the economy to return to its pre-pandemic, long-term growth path.”

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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