They Came To Hacker Lab For The High-End Tools. They Ended Up Building A Workforce.

By Ellen Garrison
The Sacramento Bee

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Meet the entrepreneur who turned “tCheck” from a 3-D printed prototype to a marketable product at a local Hacker Lab. “tCheck” is a handheld device that uses UV light to measure cannabinoids — think THC — in a material such as olive oil or butter.

The Sacramento Bee

Several years ago, a friend with a neurological condition presented the founders of Engineered Medical Technologies with an unusual problem.

She was making marijuana-infused edibles to control her condition, but she only determined how strong they were by taking them. If she made them too strong, the cookies or brownies could affect her for a day or two.

“That’s not a good way to figure out how strong your medicine is … it’s like someone giving you a pill but not telling you how strong the stuff is,” said Peichen Chang, co-founder of Engineered Medical Technologies.

Their solution was tCheck, a handheld device that uses UV light to measure cannabinoids — think THC — in a material such as olive oil or butter. Turning tCheck from a 3-D printed prototype to a marketable product required a lot of testing, equipment and skill — all of which they found at Rocklin’s Hacker Lab.

The original founders, Bryan Cowger and his daughter Dr. Megan Babb, created their prototype in Cowger’s garage using pet store UV lights meant for reptile cages. When the device correctly measured cannabinoids in a test sample, they realized they needed more help and brought Chang and Engineered Medical’s fourth founder, Mark Falcone, on board to build a company.

Hacker Lab was just launching its Rocklin location at the time after creating a successful midtown Sacramento space for entrepreneurs. Chang discovered Hacker Lab through one of the meet-ups it arranged for coders, developers, and engineers.

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