After Days Of Facebook Fallout, Zuckerberg Speaks. Here’s What He Said

By Trisha Thadani
San Francisco Chronicle

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Zuckerberg’s long-awaited statement stopped short of an apology, instead outlining some steps the company will take to protect users’ data.

San Francisco Chronicle

After days of silence, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg finally responded to revelations that a rogue partner misused millions of users’ personal data and admitted that his company — which runs the biggest social network in the world — violated its users’ trust.

“We need to fix that,” he wrote in a 937-word Facebook post.

Facebook has spent the last few days enmeshed in controversy over revelations that Cambridge Analytica, a political firm connected to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, gained access to data about millions of users.

Zuckerberg’s long-awaited statement stopped short of an apology, instead outlining some steps the company will take to keep that data out of the hands of those who would violate users’ trust.

The 33-year-old CEO said the company had made changes to its privacy settings in 2015, in an attempt to give people more control over their profiles. But, he added, “We also made mistakes, there’s more to do, and we need to step up and do it.”

Zuckerberg did not say when some of these changes will occur, and it was not clear how Facebook’s compliance might be monitored. In 2014, Zuckerberg promised developers that the company would give them two years’ warning before making major changes to their access. Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In an interview with CNN, the 33-year-old CEO apologized and said he would testify in front of Congress — as lawmakers have asked him to do — if it is “the right thing to do.”

Central to the whirlwind of criticism surrounding the Menlo Park company are concerns from users about how their information is shared with other businesses. Millions of people log on to countless apps using the social network every day, while companies — from dating networks to car-sharing services — rely on Facebook to verify their users’ identities.

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