What It’s Like To Try Transcendental Meditation

By Nicole Brodeur
The Seattle Times

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) It costs the average person almost $1,000 to learn TM, which involves setting aside 20 minutes, twice a day, to let your consciousness sink like an anchor and tap into what physician and author Norman E. Rosenthal calls “the silent core of our own being.”

SEATTLE

“They’re for my TM teacher,” I told the clerk as I leaned over the Safeway floral counter, watching him trim the ends off a bouquet of alstroemerias.

He looked up at me and grimaced.

“We’re supposed to bring a bouquet of flowers, a white handkerchief and … Oh! Two fruits!”

I walked over to the produce department and picked a pear and a grapefruit, then back to the floral counter, where the clerk had tied up the flowers with a ribbon.

“Good luck,” he said.

I didn’t need luck to do Transcendental Meditation (TM) as much as I needed to shake my skepticism and crack open my mind, and my wallet.

It costs the average person almost $1,000 to learn TM, which involves setting aside 20 minutes, twice a day, to let your consciousness sink like an anchor and tap into what physician and author Norman E. Rosenthal calls “the silent core of our own being.”

But they are doing it, and in remarkable numbers: In the past year, enrollment at the Transcendental Meditation Center in Bellevue, Wash., has gone up 61 percent.

“I’ve been teaching since 1971,” TM instructor Annie Skipper told me during a recent visit, “and I’ve never seen the stress levels as high as they are now.”

Indeed, all around, people are anxious and divided. Driving too fast and drinking too much.

Overwhelmed by posts and links and breaking news, all the while juggling their family and financial lives.

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