Podcasts Give Voice To Dreams, Passions

By Andrea Rumbaugh
Houston Chronicle

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Beau York, founder and CEO of Satchel, a location-based podcast discovery tool says shows launching in 2017 will need a niche or local focus to succeed in the more crowded podcast world. He says, “It’s all dependent on whether or not you can connect with the audience.”

Houston Chronicle

The three men leaned into their microphones and began their favorite pastime: talking nerdy to fellow comic book, board game and movie lovers. This week’s topic was the blockbuster “Logan” and the death of its claw-wielding main character.

“For me and you as avid comic book readers, we understood why Wolverine was dying,” Joey Kay said to his co-hosts during an April episode of their year-old “Nerd Thug Radio” podcast. “They could have explained it, I guess, a little better for the average viewer.”

Then they launched into a detailed explanation for their “Nerd Thug” listeners. The banter later veered to their favorite non-comic book movie characters and the game Cardfight Vanguard, wrapping up their 51st episode in as many weeks.

As podcasts become increasingly popular, local entrepreneurs like Kay, 33, and his cousins Cory De la Guardia, 33, and Nico De la Guardia, 18, are polishing their radio voices with hopes of turning passions into salaries.

But making full-time money isn’t easy, especially compared with the early days, a decade or so ago, when people could build successful podcasts around virtually any topic, said Beau York, founder and CEO of Satchel, a location-based podcast discovery tool.

Shows launching in 2017 will need a niche or local focus to succeed in the more crowded podcast world, he said.
“It’s all dependent on whether or not you can connect with the audience,” York said. “That is the trick.”

Fortunately for the startups, that audience is growing. A recent Edison Research phone survey found that 24 percent of respondents had listened to a podcast within the last month and 60 percent were familiar with the term podcasting. That was up from 9 percent and 37 percent, respectively, in 2008.

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