Women Filmmakers’ Luncheon On Unity Turns Divisive Over Issues Of Identity

By Amy Kaufman
Los Angeles Times

WWR Article Summary (tl;dr) Some major hollywood power players took time out during the Sundance Film Festival to explore how they could support women filmmakers through their respective platforms.

PARK CITY, Utah

“Is your coat wool?” Alfre Woodard asked as she sat at a long table draped with purple paisley Italian linen and an assortment of flowers. “I’m allergic to wool. I can never wear anything nice.”

Inside a mountain mansion with an indoor waterfall, heated driveway and cavernous, vaulted ceilings, at the home of Mimi Griswold, host of the acoustic-music radio show “Blue Moon Cafe”, Woodard, Elle Fanning and Jill Soloway were just part of a formidable group gathered for a lunch to celebrate women in film.

Vegan cream of broccoli soup from celebrity chef Cat Cora was served as Cindi Leive, editor in chief of Glamour, explained how the magazine had partnered with photographer and talk-show host Amanda de Cadenet’s Girlgaze, a digital initiative for women behind the camera. They wanted to take this opportunity during the Sundance Film Festival to explore how they could support women filmmakers through their respective platforms.

But while these types of occasions present plenty of moments for business-card trading and jealousy-inducing Instagram photos, the open discussion usually sticks to words of encouragement and empowerment stories.

In that spirit, the idea of mentorships for up-and-coming women in the industry was floated by De Cadenet. Director Kimberly Peirce spoke about how it was important not to stray from female pleasure on-screen and told a story about how the MPAA took issue with a female orgasm that lasted too long in her film “Boys Don’t Cry.”

Then the conversation shifted to our new president.

“My feeling,” said Salma Hayek, “is that we are about to go to war.”

Related News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *